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    Pennsylvania Workers’ Comp Attorney Notes Increase In Roofing Accidents

  • Summary

    Five roofing workers have recently died in fatal fall accidents due to a lack of safety equipment.

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    (prREACH)

    Most people don’t even think about the roof over their heads until there is a problem, but once a leak or other issue pops up, it becomes a top priority to have it repaired.

    For many roofing companies, the busiest time of year is the summer. Workers in this industry are unable to work in the rain or snow without risking additional damage to the structure of the roof and also their own safety, which is why most projects are completed on sunny warm days. But nice weather doesn’t mean that roofers aren’t at risk.

    According to OSHA, roofing is the six most dangerous industry to work in and given that the very nature of the job requires workers to continuously stay at a great height, this is not very surprising. What is surprising, however, are the number of contractors who fail to provide their employees with safety equipment that could protect them from harm.

    Just recently, after a 37-year-old roofer fell 25 feet to the ground below and died as a result of the injuries he sustained, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration announced that he was just one of five workers who had recently died because they weren’t provided with necessary fall protection. A representative for OSHA reported that “With basic fall protection in place, these employers could have prevented these tragedies.”

    It’s not just falls that injure roofers on a regular basis, common accidents also involve tools and heavy machinery. Additionally, injuries aren't the only reason that a worker can’t return to work - if not allowed to take frequent breaks and supplied with fluids, sunburn and heat stroke can land anyone in the hospital. This summer, many ill and injured workers will file workers' compensation claims.

    Employers who fail to provide their employees with a safe environment may face citations and heavy fines from OSHA. At this time, the administration has yet to announce what the outcome of their investigation into the most recent string of fatal accidents will be.

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    Jay Shor

    215-576-7600

    http://www.bulldoglawyers.com/

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