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    Attorneys At Millar & Mixon Celebrate National Dog Bite Prevention Week

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    The third week in May was National Dog Bite Prevention Week. The attorneys at Millar and Mixon celebrated this week hoping that awareness about the dangers of dog bites and how to prevent them would spread.

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    (prREACH)

    The third week of May was National Dog Bite Prevention Week, a period of time in which the American Veterinary Medical Association works to raise the public’s awareness on the steps that can be taken to prevent a dog from biting.

    As many veterinarians will tell their clients, any dog, even the nicest ones, can and will bite. However, with proper care and a recognition of the warning signs, many of these attacks can be prevented.

    The first step begins not with a potential victim but with the owner of the dog. From the moment that a dog has been adopted, the owners should consult with their veterinarian on the best way to socialize it. Many dog bites happen not because the dog is aggressive but because they are afraid. Socialization takes time and patience, but by exposing the dog to new environments and people they will be less likely to react out of fear.

    Those who are around a dog that is not their own should keep a few key safety tips in mind. These include requesting the owner’s permission before approaching a dog, avoiding yelling, running, or making sudden movements which can cause a dog to exhibit negative behaviors, leaving a dog alone who is eating or resting in its crate, and teaching children to never pull the dog’s tail, ears, or fur.

    Every year, nearly 4.5 million Americans are bitten by a dog. Around 25% of these attacks will result in serious injuries that may require hospitalization and surgical correction. Victims often find that they are suddenly suffering under the weight of growing medical bills with nowhere to turn to for help. The attorneys at Millar & Mixon hope that by encouraging the public to learn more about how they can protect themselves and their loved ones, the number of dog attacks will grow smaller each year.

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    Bruce Millar

    (770) 415-8153

    http://atlantaadvocate.com

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