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    Firm Caters to Changing Climate in Recycling Business

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    The number of e-waste recyclers in the Central Texas region continues to decrease, as the electronics recycling industry continues to make changes as to how material is being disposed of.

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    (prREACH)

    In what was once a thriving industry for Austin, just 5 years ago, the electronics recycling landscape has changed dramatically. With the current trends for recyclers having to be certified, a tough economy and changes in technology, electronics recycling is becoming a more of cost vs. revenue proposition as it had been in the past.

    In the early 1990’s, Dell Computers began making huge strides in the computer industry with its build on demand format and made the Austin/Round Rock area its hub for its corporate headquarters. At that time, the electronics industry was in its infancy and the demand for electronics recycling was not on the forefront of corporate responsibility. As demands grew for other computer manufacturers, so did the relevance of electronics recycling. However, as these computer companies grew, they began to move their manufacturing abroad and reduced the amount of products that were being produced in the Austin area, which supported several electronics recycling businesses.

    Over time, not only has electronics recycling become a growth industry, it has also become more regulated on where the final disposal of material would be. Media outlets began running stories on electronics being shipped for recycling to third world countries where children were being exposed to harmful chemicals, either through the burning of the circuit boards for the precious metals or electronics being discarded in landfills, where rain water would wash the harmful chemicals into a near-by stream. This created the need for regulations and certifications in the electronics recycling industry; thus, there is an additional cost that most recyclers in the Austin area could not keep up with and still be competitive.

    Companies such as R2 Corporation have weathered the storm and are one of the last remaining electronics recyclers in Austin. Surviving in an ever changing economy and making strategic price changes as the market fluctuates, they have been able to sustain an electronics recycling business that works with both municipalities and corporate environments. By making internal changes that reflect the importance of data security, their ability to test and remarket material before it has reached the end of service life are key factors that have helped this business stand alone as one of the last prominent e-waste recyclers in Austin.

    To find out more about R2 Corporation and its electronics recycling capabilities please visit www.resaleresource.net.

    R2 Corporation 10200 Mckalla Pl. #200 Austin, TX. 78758 512-815-CYCL (2925) Email: Egarcia@r2corp.net Website: http://www.resaleresource.net

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    Ed Garcia

    512-815-2925

    http://www.resaleresource.net

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